hackers are using WannaCry phishing emails to conduct campaigns using the fear surrounding the global network worm attacks.

An email campaign has been discovered in the United Kingdom, with BT customers being focused on. The hackers have been able to spoof BT domains and made their WannaCry phishing emails look very realistic. BT branding is used, the emails are well composed and they claim to have been shared from Libby Barr, Managing Director, Customer Care at BT. A quick review of her name on Google will reveal she is who she claims to be. The WannaCry phishing emails are realistic, cleverly put together, and are likely to trick many customers.

The emails claim that BT is working on enhancing its security after the massive ransomware campaign that impacted over 300,000 computers in 150 countries on May 12, 2017. In the UK, 20% of NHS Trusts were impacted by the incident and had data encrypted and services majorly damaged by the ransomware attacks. It would be extremely hard if you live in the UK to have avoided the news of the attacks and the extent of the damage they have inflicted.

The WannaCry phishing emails provide a very good reason for taking quick action. BT is offering a security upgrade to stop its customers from being harmed by the attacks. The emails claim that in order to keep customers’ sensitive data secure, access to certain features have been turned off on BT accounts. Customers are told that to restore their full BT account functionality they need to confirm the security upgrade by selecting the upgrade box contained in the email.

Of course, visiting the link will not lead to a security upgrade being applied. Customers are required to share their login credentials to the hackers.

Other WannaCry phishing emails are likely to be issued claiming to be originating from other broadband service providers. Similar campaigns could be used to quietly install malware or ransomware.

Hackers often take advantage of global news events that are garnering a lot of media interest. During the Olympics there were many Olympic themed spam emails. Phishing emails were also prevalent during the U.S. presidential elections, the World Cup, the Zika Virus epidemic, and following every major news stories.

it is vital never to click on links sent in email from people you do not know, be extremely careful about visiting links sent from people you do know, and assume that any email you receive could be a phishing email or other malicious message.

Just one phishing email sent to a member of staff can lead to a data breach, email or network compromise. It is therefore crucial for employers to be careful. Employees should be provided with phishing awareness training and taught the giveaway signs that emails are not authentic.  It is also vital that an advanced spam filtering solution is employed to stop most phishing emails from landing in end users inboxes.

In relation to that, TitanHQ is here to help you out. get in touch with the team now to see how SpamTitan can protect your business from phishing, malware and ransomware campaigns.